Seasoned India-lovers and adventurous armchair-travellers will be able to conjure their own India, drawing on an array of experiences and events which bring to life India’s vibrant colours and exquisite imagery, its tantalizing tastes and aromas, and the sound of its music – music of all forms.


70 Events | 70 Superb Artists | 7 Fabulous Locations | 7 Unforgettable Days
13 - 19 May 2013

Welcome to ENCOUNTERS: INDIA!Find Out More
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Details of the fourth instalment of the ENCOUNTERS have been unveiled today.
International performers Patricia Rozario (UK), Aneesh Pradhan (India), Shubha Mudgal (India), Sudhir Nayak (India), members of the Sruthi Laya Ensemble, Rajesh Mehta (Singapore), Rohan de Saram(UK) and Ramli Ibrahim (Kuala Lumpur) will join some fifty artists and thinkers from Australia for an exploration of the many links that bind and divide Australia and India.

Last Wednesday (12 Dec), as I was driving from Canberra back up to Brisbane, I listened to CDs of some of the music that we’re planning to present in ENCOUNTERS: INDIA next May (Brisbane, 9-19 May 2013). One of the CDs was a selection of pieces for flute and harp, with that masterly Australian duo Geoffrey Collins (flute) and Alice Giles (harp). Their recital was recorded in Sydney in January 1993 (twenty years ago!) and released by Belinda Webster on her Tall Poppies label (TP 031).

As part of its focus on Indian-Australian cultural intersections, ENCOUNTERS: INDIA announces a competition for musical settings of the poetry of Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). This competition observes the centenary of the award of the Nobel Prize in Literature (1913) to Tagore, the first non-European to receive this award.

ENCOUNTER (noun), a meeting, exchange, a brush or rendezvous, confrontation

For seven days in May 2013, from early morning until midnight, the South Bank precinct will be transformed into a bustling parade of contemporary India. At the Nepalese Pavilion, a lone sitar player greets the dawn; an Indian Bazaar evokes the colours and fragrances of a Delhi market on the Forecourt; throughout the parklands and streets, bursts of Bollywood recharge the mind’s battery; the Queensland Conservatorium’s many spaces echo to myriad musical styles from more than 50 concerts and masterclasses.